Theology and History II: Why understanding this relationship is crucial for avoiding shipwreck

This is the second response to the historian Roberto de Mattei’s call for Catholics to unite around the Church’s tradition: It is not possible for us to 'unite around tradition' without accepting the Church's received, traditional doctrine in its integrity. In the previous article, we considered the relationship between liturgical tradition and antiquarianism. I showed …

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Theology & History I: the relationship between liturgical tradition and antiquarianism

When this piece was first published, there were rumours about impending restrictions to the the traditional Mass, fuelled by a questionnaire sent to bishops and the expulsion of a Latin Mass group (FSSP) from the diocese of Dijon. Since then, of course, we have seen the publishing of the motu proprio Traditiones Custodes. This piece, …

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Doubtful Baptisms – reflections on the necessity for widespread access to conditional sacraments

In late 2020, it emerged that two priests had been required to seek baptism, confirmation and ordination after being invalidly baptised as infants. What are the potential consequences of the breakdown of sacramental practice in the post-conciliar Church? How does this compare to the sacramental security enjoyed in the Catholic Church prior to the Second …

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The Visible Unity of the Church III – reconciling the Church’s teachings about her own unity with the current crisis

"Though they may be utter strangers to each other in the flesh, and divided in temporal position as far as men can be divided from their fellow-men, there will be found one and the self-same faith, one and the self-same rule of morals, the self-same sacraments, and the self-same belief respecting those sacraments; there will …

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The Visible Unity of the Church II – more on what it means for the Church to be “visibly” one

Recapitulation In the previous part, we discussed the Church’s claim to be ‘one’, which in part refers to her unicity, in that our Lord Jesus Christ founded one Church rather than many. But we went further than is usually explained, presenting the Church’s teaching on her unity of faith and charity, and particularly the united …

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The Visible Unity of the Church I – on what it means to believe in “One” Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church

This article was originally published by LifeSiteNews in April 2021 as What does it mean for Catholics to believe in ‘One’ Holy Catholic Apostolic Church?[1] Reprinted with permission. Image is Murillo, Good Shepherd, from Wiki Commons. Every Sunday we profess belief in one holy catholic and apostolic Church. Many Catholics know that our Lord Jesus …

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Weaponized Orthodoxy – how to divide Catholics using sound principles, applied selectively

"Sometimes true principles can be used falsely." This article was originally published by LifeSiteNews. Reprinted with permission. “Weaponized ambiguity” has become a common term in recent discussions about the crisis in the Church. It refers to ambiguous terms that were supposedly inserted into Vatican II as preparation for the chaos we now see around us. …

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